The prince

The prince


The Prince

The Prince

The Prince is the most controversial book about winning power - and holding on to it - ever written. Machiavelli's tough-minded, pragmatic argument that sometimes it is necessary to abandon ethics to succeed made his name notorious. Yet his book has been read by strategists, politicians and business people ever since as the ultimate guide to realpolitik. How can a leader be strong and decisive, yet still inspire loyalty in his followers? How do you keep your enemies in check? Is it better to be feared than loved? When is it necessary to break the rules? This shrewd handbook on how power really works answers all these questions by examining regimes and their rulers around the world and throughout history, from Roman emperors to renaissance Popes, from the savagely cruel Hannibal to the utterly devious Cesare di Borgia. Tim Parks's gripping contemporary translation delivers Machiavelli's no-nonsense original straight, making it as alarming and enlightening as when it was first written.

Machiavelli: The Prince

Machiavelli: The Prince

In his introduction to this new translation by Russell Price, Professor Skinner presents a lucid analysis of Machiavelli's text as a response both to the world of Florentine politics, and as an attack on the advice-books for princes published by a number of his contemporaries. This new edition includes notes on the principal events in Machiavelli's life, and on the vocabulary of The Prince, as well as biographical notes on characters in the text.

Portraying the Prince in the Renaissance

The Humanist Depiction of Rulers in Historiographical and Biographical Texts

Portraying the Prince in the Renaissance

The portrayal of princes plays a central role in the historical literature of the European Renaissance. The sixteen contributions collected in this volume examine such portrayals in a broad variety of historiographical, biographical, and poetic texts. It emerges clearly that historical portrayals were not essentially bound by generic constraints but instead took the form of res gestae or historiae, discrete or collective biographies, panegyric, mirrors for princes, epic poetry, orations, even commonplace books – whatever the occasion called for. Beyond questions of genre, the chapters focus on narrative strategies and the transformation of ancient, medieval, and contemporary authors, as well as on the influence of political, cultural, intellectual, and social contexts. Four broad thematic foci inform the structure of this book: the virtues ascribed to the prince, the cultural and political pretensions inscribed in literary portraits, the historical and literary models on which these portraits were based, and the method that underlay them. The volume is rounded out by a critical summary that considers the portrayal of princes in humanist historiogrpahy from the point of view of transformation theory.

The Prince (Wootton Edition)

The Prince (Wootton Edition)

"This is an excellent, readable and vigorous translation of The Prince, but it is much more than simply a translation. The map, notes and guide to further reading are crisp, to-the-point and yet nicely comprehensive. The inclusion of the letter to Vettori is most welcome. But, above all, the Introduction is so gripping and lively that it has convinced me to include The Prince in my syllabus for History of Western Civilization the next time that I teach it. . . . Great price, too! And lovely printing and layout." --Rachel Fulton, University of Chicago

The Prince and the Pauper

The Prince and the Pauper

When young Edward VI of England and a poor boy who resembles him exchange places, each learns something about the other's very different station in life.

The Prince of Medicine

Galen in the Roman Empire

The Prince of Medicine

The remarkable career of Galen of Pergamum (A.D. 129 - 216) began as a provincial medic tending to wounded gladiators in Asia Minor. It ended at the very heart of Roman power as one of a small circle of court physicians to the Emperor Marcus Aurelius. Susan Mattern's The Prince of Medicine offers the first authoritative biography of this brilliant, audacious, and profoundly influential figure. Like many Greek intellectuals living in the high Roman Empire, Galen was a prodigious polymath, writing on subjects as varied as ethics and eczema, grammar and gout. Indeed, he was highly regarded in his lifetime as much for his philosophical works as for his medical treatises, and his writings, published in twenty-two volumes, comprise fully one-eighth of all surviving classical Greek literature. From the later Roman Empire through the Renaissance, medical education would be based primarily on his works. Even up to the twentieth century, he would remain the single most influential figure in western medicine. Mattern presents a Galen possessed of breathtaking arrogance, fierce competitiveness (he once disemboweled a live monkey and challenged the physicians in attendance to correctly replace its organs), shameless self-promotion, and lacerating wit. Not just caustic and polemical, mocking his enemies and hurling abuse at them, Galen was also a brilliant critical thinker and rhetorical strategist. He is also credited with being the first physician with a good bedside manner. Relentless in pursuit of anything that would cure the patient, he insisted on rigorous observation and experiment. Even confronting one of human history's most horrific events - a devastating outbreak of smallpox - he persevered, bearing patient witness to its predations, year after year. Including intriguing character studies of Marcus Aurelius, Commodus (of Gladiator infamy), Galen's family and close friends, several of his patients, not a few of his rivals, and the city of Rome at itsapex of power and decadence, The Prince of Medicine offers a deeply human and long-overdue portrait of one of ancient history's most significant and engaging figures.

The Prince Warriors

The Prince Warriors

Based on Ephesians 6:10–18, The Prince Warriors is the first book in an epic middle reader series that brings to life the invisible struggle occurring in the spiritual realm.

The Prince

The Prince

The classic handbook of statecraft written four centuries ago by an Italian nobleman recommends guile and craftiness to attain and maintain political power.

Omai

The Prince who Never was

Omai

A vivid account of the tragedy of England's first black celebrity, the story of the Tahitian prince brought to England by Captain Cook's companion.