The Everlasting Man

The Everlasting Man

The Everlasting Man is a Christian apologetics book written by G. K. Chesterton. It is, to some extent, a deliberate rebuttal of H. G. Wells' The Outline of History, disputing Wells' portrayals of human life and civilisation as a seamless development from animal life and of Jesus Christ as merely another charismatic figure. Chesterton detailed his own spiritual journey in Orthodoxy, but in this book he tries to illustrate the spiritual journey of humanity, or at least of Western civilisation.

The Everlasting Man

The Everlasting Man

A history of humanity, Christ, and Christianity, this 1925 polemic famously converted C. S. Lewis from atheism. Chesterton's view of Christianity&- as a rare blend of philosophy and mythology, satisfying to both intellect and spirit&- applies to his brilliant book, which appeals to readers' heads as well as their hearts.

Heretics, Orthodoxy & The Everlasting Man

Chesterton's Works on Christianity & Spirituality (Including Author's Autobiography)

Heretics, Orthodoxy & The Everlasting Man

Apart from his detective stories, G. K. Chesterton is well known for his reasoned apologetics. Even some of those who disagree with him have recognized the wide appeal of his Theological Works. Chesterton routinely referred to himself as an "orthodox" Christian, and came to identify this position more and more with Catholicism, eventually converting to Catholicism from High Church Anglicanism. "Heretics" is a collection of 20 essays and presents Chesterton's first book of Christian apologetics. Chesterton describes his understanding of the words Orthodox and Heretic as they apply to, and have changed in, the modern period. Chesterton argues that in modernity, "The word 'orthodoxy' not only no longer means being right; it practically means being wrong". He continues to make a point that society no longer tolerates a man's life philosophy or religion, yet is increasingly absorbed in "art for art's sake". "Orthodoxy" has become a classic of Christian apologetics. In the book's preface Chesterton states the purpose is to "attempt an explanation, not of whether the Christian faith can be believed, but of how he personally has come to believe it." In it, Chesterton presents an original view of Christian religion. He sees it as the answer to natural human needs, the "answer to a riddle" in his own words, and not simply as an arbitrary truth received from somewhere outside the boundaries of human experience. "The Everlasting Man" is the third of Chesterton's Christian apologetics book. It is, to some extent, a deliberate rebuttal of H. G. Wells' The Outline of History, disputing Wells' portrayals of human life and civilization as a seamless development from animal life and of Jesus Christ as merely another charismatic figure. Chesterton detailed his own spiritual journey in Orthodoxy, but in this book he tries to illustrate the spiritual journey of humanity, or at least of Western civilization.

The Everlasting Man vs The Outline of History [abridged] (illustrated and annotated)

The Everlasting Man vs The Outline of History [abridged] (illustrated and annotated)

In a battle for the Western soul - Christ or the Secular - Chesterton vs Wells Your Special 2 for 1 Illustrated & Annotated edition includes: + Bibliography of G. K. Chesterton since 1980 – MLA 7th edition format for quick research! + Over 200 pages of “Outline of History” touching on Christian doctrine + 11 brand new line art Chisel Drawings™ of Chesterton through his life by sequential artist Lucio Marcetti + Exclusive biography “The Boyhood Days of G.K. Chesterton” + Treatise on the “Works of H.G. Wells” C.S. Lewis, author of the Chronicles of Narnia series, regarded Chesterton's humble defense of Christianity as having 'baptised' his intellect. "The best popular apologetic I know" - C.S. Lewis

The Everlasting Man

The Everlasting Man


J. R. R. Tolkien's Sanctifying Myth

Understanding Middle-earth

J. R. R. Tolkien's Sanctifying Myth

Since the appearance of The Lord of the Rings in 1954, J. R. R. Tolkien’s works have always sold briskly, appealing to a wide and diverse audience of intellectuals, religious believers, fantasy enthusiasts, and science fiction aficionados. Now, Peter Jackson’s film version of Tolkien’s trilogy—with its accompanying Rings-related paraphernalia and publicity—is playing a unique role in the dissemination of Tolkien’s imaginative creation to the masses. Yet, for most readers and viewers, the underlying meaning of Middle-earth has remained obscure. Bradley Birzer has remedied that with this fresh study. In J. R. R. Tolkien’s Sanctifying Myth: Understanding Middle-earth, Birzer explains the surprisingly specific religious symbolism that permeates Tolkien’s Middle-earth legendarium. He also explores the social and political views that motivated the Oxford don, ultimately situating Tolkien within the Christian humanist tradition represented by Thomas More and T. S. Eliot, Dante and C. S. Lewis. Birzer argues that through the genre of myth Tolkien created a world that is essentially truer than the one we think we see around us every day, a world that transcends the colorless disenchantment of our postmodern age. “A small knowledge of history,” Tolkien once wrote, “depresses one with the sense of the everlasting weight of human iniquity.” As Birzer demonstrates, Tolkien’s recognition of evil became mythologically manifest in the guise of Ringwraiths, Orcs, Sauron, and other dark beings. But Tolkien was ultimately optimistic: even weak, bumbling hobbits and humans, as long as they cling to the Good, can finally prevail. Bradley Birzer has performed a great service in elucidating Tolkien’s powerful moral vision.

The A-Z of C.S. Lewis

An Encyclopaedia of His Life, Thought, and Writings

The A-Z of C.S. Lewis

This fascinating volume brings together all the aspects of C S Lewis's life and thought. It will delight anyone who is interested in C S Lewis and wants to learn more about him. Arranged in alphabetical order The A-Z of C S Lewis begins with The Abolition of Man a book written in 1943 and described by Lewis as almost my favourite to Wormwood, a character in The Screwtape Letters. Lewis's work is widely known and regarded, but enthusiasts are often only aware of one small part his children's stories and his popular theology and yet he wrote so much more, including science fiction and literary criticism. This is an enormously readable and attractive work that will be read time and time again.

G K Chesterton's Christian Writings (Unabridged): Everlasting Man, Orthodoxy, Heretics, St Francis of Assisi, St. Thomas Aquinas and the Man Who Was T

G K Chesterton's Christian Writings (Unabridged): Everlasting Man, Orthodoxy, Heretics, St Francis of Assisi, St. Thomas Aquinas and the Man Who Was T

This Omnibus edition of g K Chesterton's writings includes the following complete and unabridged classic books: The Everlasting Man. What makes the human uniquely human? This is the question that G.K. Chesterton starts with in this exploration of human history. Chesterton responds to H.G. Wells, affirming the uniqueness of being human and the message of the Christian faith. Chesterton refutes the idea of Social Darwinism, which claims that we have been gradually evolving from the barbaric to the civilised state we currently find ourselves in. He sees Christianity as a blend of reason and story, which satisfies both the mind and the heart. Orthodoxy. Chesterton explores "right thinking" and explains how it led him to come to faith. This is a very personal account of his conversion, but Chesterton makes it clear that for him it was as a result of his scholarly examination of Christianity's arguments. Heretics. Chesterton is at his very witty best in this collection of twenty articles. He focussed his brilliant mind on "heretics," prominent figures who Chesterton considers theologically wrong, including Kipling, Shaw, Wells, and Whistler. St Francis of Assisi. Francis of Assisi is without doubt on of the greatest saints, and hugely influential in human history. This biography by G. K. Chesterton is considered to be the greatest tribute to this great man's life and one that fully appreciates what St Francis offered to humanity. St Thomas Aquinas. This Biography of St Thomas Aquinas ranks as one of the best books ever written on the life and thought of this great saint. Aquinas was shy and dubbed "the Dumb Ox" by his classmates. Little did they know that he was an unparalleled genius and would revolutionise Christian thought. The Man who was Thursday. This book is included because like much of G. K. Chesterton's fiction, it is full of Christian allegory. This is a true masterpiece, a psychological thriller that weaves its way around seven anarchists who are called by the names of the days of the week. The aim of the book is to expose moral relativism and nihilism for the evil that they are.