The Human Figure in Motion

The Human Figure in Motion

"196 plates (containing over 4700 individual photographs) from the famous Muybridge collection, chosen for their value to artists, doctors, and researchers"--Jacket.

The Corporate Eye

Photography and the Rationalization of American Commercial Culture, 1884–1929

The Corporate Eye

In the late nineteenth century, corporate managers began to rely on photography for everything from motion studies to employee selection to advertising. This practice gave rise to many features of modern industry familiar to us today: consulting, "scientific" approaches to business practice, illustrated advertising, and the use of applied psychology. In this imaginative study, Elspeth H. Brown examines the intersection of photography as a mass technology with corporate concerns about efficiency in the Progressive period. Discussing, among others, the work of Frederick W. Taylor, Eadweard Muybridge, Frank Gilbreth, and Lewis Hine, Brown explores this intersection through a variety of examples, including racial discrimination in hiring, the problem of photographic realism, and the gendered assumptions at work in the origins of modern marketing. She concludes that the goal uniting the various forms and applications of photographic production in that era was the increased rationalization of the modern economy through a set of interlocking managerial innovations, technologies that sought to redesign not only industrial production but the modern subject as well.

Muybridge's Human Figure in Motion

Muybridge's Human Figure in Motion

A pioneer in the art and science of photography, Eadweard Muybridge developed the use of multiple cameras to capture motion too quick for the eye to detect. This remarkable collection of his famous stopped-action photographs features 166 photographic sequences, in which men and women, mostly nude, perform a variety of motions—running, jumping, lifting, and other activities. Essential for artists, illustrators, and flash animators, these strips can be put to imaginative use in art and craft projects as well. Special Bonus: includes 10 Flash animations plus 15 photographic sequences that are ready to be animated.

American Artist

American Artist


Philadelphia, Three Centuries of American Art

Selections from the Bicentennial Exhibition Held at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from April 11 to October 10, 1976

Philadelphia, Three Centuries of American Art


The Depression Years

The Depression Years

Rothstein's photographs provide a moving chronicle of rural and urban life, small-town America, and important labor and political events from 1936 to 1941

Pre-cinema History

An Encyclopaedia and Annotated Bibliography of the Moving Image Before 1896

Pre-cinema History


Drawn to Life: 20 Golden Years of Disney Master Classes Volume 1

Volume 1: The Walt Stanchfield Lectures

Drawn to Life: 20 Golden Years of Disney Master Classes Volume 1

Discover the lessons that helped bring about a new golden age of Disney animation! Published for the first time ever, Drawn to Life is a two volume collection of the legendary lectures from long-time Disney animator Walt Stanchfield. For over twenty years, Walt helped breathe life into the new golden age of animation with these teachings at the Walt Disney Animation Studios and influenced such talented artists as Tim Burton, Brad Bird, Glen Keane, and John Lasseter. These writings represent the quintessential refresher for fine artists and film professionals, and it is a vital tutorial for students who are now poised to be part of another new generation in the art form. Written by Walt Stanchfield (1919-2000), who began work for the Walt Disney Studios in the 1950s. His work can be seen in films like Sleeping Beauty, The Jungle Book, 101 Dalmatians, and Peter Pan. Edited by Academy Award®-nominated producer Don Hahn, who has prduced such classic Disney films as Beauty and the Beast and The Lion King.

Moving Pictures

American Art and Early Film, 1880-1910

Moving Pictures

Published in conjunction with a 2005-2007 exhibition organized by the Williams College Museum of Art, this volume addresses the rich topic of comparisons across theater, film, and the visual arts during the late 19th century and the beginning of the 20th. Seventeen essays are arranged in sections on early film and American artistic traditions. 183 colour & 100 b/w illustrations