Diary of a Madman and Other Stories

Diary of a Madman and Other Stories

Xun (or Hsun) is the master (inventor?) of the modern Chinese short story. Some of his stories were translated into American English in 1941, but more recent translations have been into a British English. Lyell provides an introduction, notes on pronunciation and further notes on the text, intending to win as wide an audience as possible beyond those already familiar with Chinese history and culture. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Tales of the Madman Underground

Tales of the Madman Underground

Wednesday, September 5, 1973: The first day of Karl Shoemaker's senior year in stifling Lightsburg, Ohio. For years, Karl's been part of what he calls "the Madman Underground" - a group of kids forced (for no apparent reason) to attend group therapy during school hours. Karl has decided that senior year is going to be different. He is going to get out of the Madman Underground for good. He is going to act - and be - Normal. But Normal, of course, is relative. Karl has five after-school jobs, one dead father, one seriously unhinged drunk mother . . . and a huge attitude. Welcome to a gritty, uncensored rollercoaster ride, narrated by the singular Karl Shoemaker.

The Life of the Madman of U

The Life of the Madman of U

The Life of the Madman of Ü tells the story of Künga Zangpo (1458-1532), a famous Tibetan Buddhist ascetic of the Kagyü sect. Having grown weary of the trials of human existence, Künga Zangpo renounced the world during his teenage years, committing himself to learning and practicing the holy Dharma as a monk. Some years later he would give up his monkhood to take on a unique tantric asceticism that entailed dressing in human remains, wandering from place to place, and provoking others to attack him physically, among other norm-overturning behaviors. It was because of this asceticism that Künga Zangpo came to be known as the Madman of Ü. David M. Divalerio translates this biography, originally written in two parts in 1494 and 1537, making accessible to a modern audience a rich depiction of religious life in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Tibet. The book also details Künga Zangpo's many miracles, a testament to the spiritual perfection he attained. His final thirty years were spent at his monastery of Tsimar Pel, where he dispensed teachings to his numerous disciples and followers. The Life of this remarkable and controversial figure, now available in English for the first time, provides new means for understanding the tradition of the "holy madman" (smyon pa) in Tibetan Buddhism.

Madman

Madman

If there is a way into madness, logic says there is a way out. Logic says. Tallis, a philosopher's servant, is sent to a Greek academy in Palestine only to discover that it has silently, ominously disappeared. No one will tell him what happened, but he learns what has become of four of its scholars. One was murdered. One committed suicide. One worships in the temple of Dionysus. And one is a madman. From the author of The Brother's Keeper comes a tale of mystery, horror, and hope in the midst of unimaginable darkness, the story behind the Geresene demoniac of the gospels of Mark and Luke.

The Madman - His Parables and Poems

The Madman - His Parables and Poems

Gibran Khalil Gibran (1883 – 1931) was a Lebanese-American poet, writer, and artist best known as the author of “The Prophet” (1923), which is one of the best-selling books of all time. Gibran's work covers such themes as justice, religion, science, free will, love, happiness, the soul, the body, and death. He is widely considered to have been one of the most important figures in Arabic poetry and literature during the first half of the twentieth century. Originally published in 1918, “The Madman" is a thought-provoking collection of aphoristic parables and poetry that explores the desires and motivations of humankind. Contents include: “How I Became a Madman," "The Two Hermits," "The Wise Dog," "The Good God and the Evil God," "Night and the Madman," "The Three Ants," "When My Sorrow Was Born," "And When My Joy Was Born," etc. Other notable works by this author include: “Music” (1905), “Rebellious Spirits” (1908), and “Broken Wings” (1912). This volume is highly recommended for fans Gibran's seminal work and it would make for a worthy addition to any collection. Many vintage books such as this are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially-commissioned new biography of the author.

The Madman

The Madman

Soon after Brian Dawson and his wife, Miranda, move into a lake cottage to be closer to her family, he sits on the dock, gazing at the setting sun. Lost in his reflections on his marriage and life, Brian soon realizes there is a man standing on the island across the lake. As the man and Brian lock gazes, the man suddenly begins savagely stabbing a wooden staff into the water until he snags a fish. Seconds later, he turns and retreats into a fishing hut. Led by curiosity, Brian decides his new mission in life is to find out the identity of this madman. Even after Brian learns that the owner of the fishing hut died years ago and that his only son never returned from the Afghanistan war, he cannot shake the feeling that something evil is living on the island. While Brian is plagued by seemingly foretelling pseudo-dreams, he relentlessly pursues knowledge regarding the unknown visitor. But when it appears someone is on a murderous spree, suddenly Brians mission takes on new meaning as his destiny rises up to meet him. In this psychological thriller, a man tormented by visions of a lunatic embarks on a twisted journey that leads him in an unimaginable direction.

The Madman

His Parables and Poems

The Madman

Life-affirming parables and poems by the author of The Prophet cast an ironic light on the beliefs, aspirations and vanities of humanity. Also features 3 illustrations by author.

The Madman

The Madman

You ask me how I became a madman. It happened thus: One day, long before many gods were born, I woke from a deep sleep and found all my masks were stolen—the seven masks I have fashioned and worn in seven lives—I ran maskless through the crowded streets shouting, “Thieves, thieves, the cursed thieves.” Men and women laughed at me and some ran to their houses in fear of me. And when I reached the market place, a youth standing on a house-top cried, “He is a madman.” I looked up to behold him; the sun kissed my own naked face for the first time. For the first time the sun kissed my own naked face and my soul was inflamed with love for the sun, and I wanted my masks no more. And as if in a trance I cried, “Blessed, blessed are the thieves who stole my masks.” Thus I became a madman. And I have found both freedom and safety in my madness; the freedom of loneliness and the safety from being understood, for those who understand us enslave something in us. But let me not be too proud of my safety. Even a thief in a jail is safe from another thief.

ANOTHER MANIFESTO OF A MADMAN FOR GOOD

ANOTHER MANIFESTO OF A MADMAN FOR GOOD

Distractions are all around us and come from all directions; some come in the form of pictures, movies or even books that we greatly enjoy, but still keep us from what we were planning. Distractions come from news outlets, talking heads, and what used to be reporters, government and business leaders who are trying to not only add to their bottom lines, but also distract us because they don't want us to know what's really going on and what they're really planning. They figure if we keep fighting amongst ourselves and buying materialistic crap we don't need, we will be pacified, won't see what's really going on, and therefore wouldn't unite and rise up to stop the whole damn thing. Knowing the distractions are out there is the first step. The second step is to decipher the distractions and their root and truthful definitions so we can slow and then end their sinister intentions.

The Yogin and the Madman

Reading the Biographical Corpus of Tibet's Great Saint Milarepa

The Yogin and the Madman

Tibetan biographers began writing Jetsun Milarepa's (1052–1135) life story shortly after his death, initiating a literary tradition that turned the poet and saint into a model of virtuosic Buddhist practice throughout the Himalayan world. Andrew Quintman traces this history and its innovations in narrative and aesthetic representation across four centuries, culminating in a detailed analysis of the genre's most famous example, composed in 1488 by Tsangnyön Heruka, or the "Madman of Western Tibet." Quintman imagines these works as a kind of physical body supplanting the yogin's corporeal relics.