In Pursuit of the Truth

In Pursuit of the Truth

If you were told, you are a free moral agent, you were lied to. If you were told, you are basically a good person, you were lied to. If you were told, one church is as good as another, you were lied to. If you were told, you could worship God with crucifixes, statues, jewelry, crosses, etc. you were lied to. If you were told, everyone is a child of God, you were lied to. If you were told, baptism was a necessary part of salvation, you were lied to. If you weren’t told about being born again, saved, or regenerated, you were being lied to If you were told, Jesus died for the sins of everyone, you were lied to. If you were told, infants could be baptized, you were lied to. If you were told, baptism washed away your sins, you were lied to. If you were told, you had to belong to a church, or a certain church, you were lied to. If you are a member of a church that Jesus didn’t build, you are being lied to. If you were told, your honesty, integrity, loyalty, goodness, etc. would save you, you were lied to. If you think truth is irrelevant, you are dead wrong, or if you think your idea of truth is okay, you’re dead in trespasses and sins. Romans 1:18, “For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men who hold the truth in unrighteousness;”

Pursuit of Truth

Pursuit of Truth

In Pursuit of Truth W. V. Quine gives us his latest word on issues to which he has devoted many years. As he says in the preface: "In these pages I have undertaken to update, sum up, and clarify my variously intersecting views on cognitive meaning, objective reference, and the grounds of knowledge?'The pursuit of truth is a quest that links observation, theory, and the world. Various faulty efforts to forge such links have led to much intellectual confusion. Quine's efforts to get beyond the confusion begin by rejecting the very idea of binding together word and thing, rejecting the focus on the isolated word. For him, observation sentences and theoretical sentences are the alpha and omega ofthe scientific enterprise. Notions like "idea" and "meaning" are vague, but a sentence-now there's something you can sink your teeth into. Starting thus with sentences, Quine sketches an epistemological setting for the pursuit of truth. He proceeds to show how reification and reference contribute to the elaborate structure that can indeed relate science to its sensory evidence.In this book Quine both summarizes and moves ahead. Rich, lively chapters dissect his major concerns-evidence, reference, meaning, intension, and truth. "Some points;' he writes, "have become clearer in my mind in the eight years since Theories and Things. Some that were already clear in my mind have become clearer on paper. And there are some that have meanwhile undergone substantive change for the better." This is a key book for understanding the effort that a major philosopher has made a large part of his life's work: to naturalize epistemology in the twentieth century. The book is concise and elegantly written, as one would expect, and does not assume the reader's previous acquaintance with Quine's writings. Throughout, it is marked by Quine's wit and economy of style.

In Pursuit of the Good

Intellect and Action in Aristotle's Ethics

In Pursuit of the Good

What is friendship? What is the best life? How does one decide? Try Salem on Aristotle.

In Pursuit of the Natural Sign

Azorín and the Poetics of Ekphrasis

In Pursuit of the Natural Sign

This is the first major study on Azorin to appear in two decades. The first part explores parallels between the cultural milieus in France and Spain when both countries lost their colonies in the second half of the nineteenth century. The second part studies the fiction and essays of Jose Martinez Ruiz (Azorin). Illustrated.

IN PURSUIT OF THE FREE PASS

The Liberal war on Christianity and the United States of America

IN PURSUIT OF THE FREE PASS

John Howard, asks: WHY? Why can’t we display the Ten Commandments in public places? Why can’t we say Merry Christmas, even though that’s the holiday we are celebrating? Why do we all have to kowtow to the liberal Church of the Enlightened’s dictates and lack of morals? Why can’t children pray in school, if that is their choice? Why can’t we find out the truth about our elected leaders who pay attorneys to cover up their past? And WHAT can the right-thinking Christian majority do about changing the messages that are sent out each day, seeking to dismiss them as crazy people that seek to destroy this great nation? The United States of America is the greatest country in the world and only when right-thinking foundational principles are brought to surface, can we truly have a nation of which to be proud.

The Pursuit of Truth

A Historian's Memoir

The Pursuit of Truth

William H. McNeill's seminal book The Rise of the West: A History of the Human Community (1963) received the National Book Award in 1964 and was later named one of the 100 best nonfiction books of the twentieth century by the Modern Library. From his post at the University of Chicago, McNeill became one of the first contemporary North American historians to write world history, seeking a broader interpretation of human affairs than prevailed in his youth. This candid, intellectual memoir from one of the most famous and influential historians of our era, The Pursuit of Truth charts the development of McNeill's thinking and writing over seven decades. At the core of his worldview is the belief that historical truth does not derive exclusively from criticizing, paraphrasing, and summarizing written documents, nor is history merely a record of how human intentions and plans succeeded or failed. Instead, McNeill believes that human lives are immersed in vast overarching processes of change. Ecological circumstances frame and limit human action, while in turn humans have been able to alter their environment more and more radically as technological skill and knowledge increased. McNeill believes that the human adventure on earth is unique, and that it rests on an unmatched system of communication. The web of human communication, whether spoken, written, or digital, has fostered both voluntary and involuntary cooperation and sustained behavioral changes, permitting a single species to spread over an entire planet and to alter terrestrial flows of energy and ideas to an extraordinary degree. Over the course of his career as a historian, teacher, and mentor, McNeill expounded the range of history and integrated it into an evolutionary worldview uniting physical, biological, and intellectual processes. Accordingly, The Pursuit of Truth explores the personal and professional life of a man who affected the way a core academic discipline has been taught and understood in America.

Breakout Nations: In Pursuit of the Next Economic Miracles

Breakout Nations: In Pursuit of the Next Economic Miracles

International Bestseller One of Foreign Policy's "21 Books to Read in 2012" A Publishers Weekly Top 10 Business Book “The best book on global economic trends I’ve read in a while.”—Fareed Zakaria, CNN GPS To identify the economic stars of the future we should abandon the habit of extrapolating from the recent past and lumping wildly diverse countries together. We need to remember that sustained economic success is a rare phenomenon. After years of rapid growth, the most celebrated emerging markets—Brazil, Russia, India, and China—are about to slow down. Which countries will rise to challenge them? In his best-selling book, writer and investor Ruchir Sharma identifies which countries are most likely to leap ahead and why, drawing insights from time spent on the ground and detailed demographic, political, and economic analysis. With a new chapter on America’s future economic prospects, Breakout Nations offers a captivating picture of the shifting balance of global economic power among emerging nations and the West.

In Pursuit of the Green Lion

A Margaret of Ashbury Novel

In Pursuit of the Green Lion

The unforgettable Margaret of Ashbury returns in the second book of the trilogy that began with A Vision of Light. Margaret, a resourceful midwife, is living with the insufferable relatives of her third husband, Gilbert de Vilers, known as Gregory. She is carving out a life for herself and her daughters despite the hostility and greed of her in-laws. But when Gregory is captured in France and held for ransom, Margaret knows she must take action—her in-laws are too tight with money to be of any use—so she teams up with her old friends Mother Hilde, the herbalist, and Brother Malachi, an alchemist on a quest for the secret of changing base metals into gold. Together, the trio plan to rescue Gregory and bring him back to London, where he and Margaret can start a new life away from his meddling family. And thus begins a wild romp across fourteenth-century Europe. Murderous noblemen, scheming ladies, truculent ghosts, and a steady stream of challenges plague the journey. Margaret will need not only her special gift of healing, her quick mind, and her independent spirit but the loyalty of her friends and the love of her new husband to carry them all safely home. From the Trade Paperback edition.

In Pursuit of the Proper Sinner

An Inspector Lynley Novel: 10

In Pursuit of the Proper Sinner

When the body of Nicola Maiden, the daughter of a retired Scotland Yard undercover officer, is found near an unidentified body in the middle of a pre-historic stone circle in Derbyshire, the newly married Inspector Lynley is asked to lead the investigation into the deaths. Lynley must get to the bottom of the crime without the assistance of his long-time partner Sergeant Barbara Havers following her demotion as a result of an internal investigation. But Barbara Havers has plans of her own, and they involve the very case that Lynley is working on . . .

The Education of Grandpa Bobar: in Pursuit of Excellence

The Education of Grandpa Bobar: in Pursuit of Excellence

The education of grandpa Bobar has proceeded from an early childhood to what I prefer to call a second childhood rather than retirement. What went undetected during all these years, until now, was how excellence was encrypted in my education, even beyond the appreciation I have always had for the excellence of my many teachers. I hope this anecdotal memoir with a message about excellence gives the reader an opportunity to look more closely into the role excellence has played in their own educational development.