How to Draw a Map

How to Draw a Map

Introduces the basics of mapmaking and describes elements that can be added to maps to improve their level of detail, including scales, grids, and landmarks.

How to Draw a Map of the Forest

How to Draw a Map of the Forest

Once again it's time to roam the country by car, bike, boat, plane, and foot-- perhaps minus a wounded toe. Make your reservation to join Senator and Wendy V as they tackle a 6,000-mile spread of the United States. Don't be overwhelmed; you just need an occasionally accurate map, comfortable shoes, about half of the alphabet, and a sense of humor. They'll be happy to have you ride along. Just tell 'em Lyin' Jimmy sent you!

How to Draw a Map

How to Draw a Map

How to Draw a Map is a fascinating meditation on the centuries-old art of map-making, from the first astronomical maps to the sophisticated GPS guides of today.

A Sense of Place

Teaching Children about the Environment with Picture Books

A Sense of Place

Describes children's books on nature and our relationship to the environment, and provides instructions for hands-on activities and projects, in areas such as life cycles, animals, climate, habitat, and protecting the environment.

How to Draw Ireland's Sights and Symbols

How to Draw Ireland's Sights and Symbols

Presents step-by-step directions for drawing the national flag, currency, map, and other symbols.

How to Study in College

How to Study in College

This best-selling text has helped over a million students transform adequate work into academic success. The Tenth Edition maintains the straightforward and traditional academic format that has made it the leading study skills text in the market. HOW TO STUDY IN COLLEGE provides an added focus on the three-step path to study success: to be a successful student you need to build a strong study skills foundation and then gain, retain, and explain information. Students will find it easier to gauge their progress and place their academic activity in clearer context when they think of their coursework in these terms. Based on widely tested educational and learning theories, HOW TO STUDY IN COLLEGE teaches study techniques such as visual thinking, active listening, concentration, note taking, and test taking, while also incorporating material on vocabulary building. Questions in the Margin, based on the Cornell Note Taking System, places key questions about content in the margins of the text to provide students with a means for reviewing and reciting the book's main ideas. Students then use this concept -- the Q-System -- to formulate their own questions. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Post Enumeration Survey

Interviewer's Manual for Followup : 1990 Decennial Census

Post Enumeration Survey


The Journey of Joenes

The Journey of Joenes

The Journey of Joenes, also published as Journey Beyond Tomorrow, tells the tale of a picaresque journey through an imagined future taken by a naive and innocent man unprepared for the wonders and oddities he encounters. Sheckley examines the present through the distorting lens of a future wonderfully skewed from, and yet darkly, hilariously similar to, our own world. From the very beginning of his career, Robert Sheckley was recognized by fans, reviewers, and fellow authors as a master storyteller and the wittiest satirist working in the science fiction field. Open Road is proud to republish his acclaimed body of work, with nearly thirty volumes of full-length fiction and short story collections. Rediscover, or discover for the first time, a master of science fiction who, according to the New York Times, was “a precursor to Douglas Adams.” “I have always loved Robert Sheckley. . . . I don’t know of anyone else in SF who has written quite so many classic stories . . . wittier than Pohl . . . blacker than Lenny Bruce, subtler and more bent that the Firesigns and Monty Python put together . . . The key words with Sheckley are clever, deadly cool and crazy as a bedbug.” —Spider Robinson