AS-level Biology

Mind the Gap : Bridging the Gap Between GCSE and AS-level Biology

AS-level Biology

Designed to bridge the gap between GCSE and AS-level Biology, this book covers the GCSE topics to help students when they start their A-level.

Learning from Head Start

A Teacher's Guide to School Readiness

Learning from Head Start

Often referred to as a laboratory from which the general early childhood education community can learn, Head Start has benefited from more than 45 years of experience. Its unique blend of early childhood practices, assessments, and monitoring, along with a social service style approach, contribute to Head Start standing out as a premiere early childhood program. This book is designed to be a teaching tool for workshops and courses as well as an on-site resource for current and future Head Start teaching staff and others in early childhood education. By presenting background information, vignettes, research, and classroom activities, this book on school readiness combines best practices in early childhood education with relevant applications. Topics, written by experts in their fields, include: Approaches to learning and teaching strategies Assessments Behavior management Classroom set up Curriculum and lesson plans Early language, literacy, math, science, social studies, and creative arts Physical health and development (gross and fine motor skills) Social and emotional development Teaching young children with disabilities and dual language learners Tips for involving parents in their children’s education

The Evolutionary Biology of Flies

The Evolutionary Biology of Flies

Flies (Dipteria) have had an important role in deepening scientists'understanding of modern biology and evolution. The study of flies has figured prominently in major advances in the fields of molecular evolution, physiology, genetics, phylogenetics, and ecology over the last century. This volume, with contributions from top scientists and scholars in the field, brings together diverse aspects of research and will be essential reading for entomologists and fly researchers.

Innocence Remembered, a Path to Personal and Global Healing

Innocence Remembered, a Path to Personal and Global Healing

INNOCENCE REMEMBERED takes you on a journey through the mysteries of human nature and discusses the key aspects of good health and healing. The main objective is to point out how beliefs of right and wrong, and guilt and innocence, affect our everyday lives on a personal, as well as on a global level. After completing this journey you will understand why we continue to create dis-ease and suffering, and how we can change course. You will feel more compassionate with yourself and others, have more trust in the benevolence of the universal forces, and create your experiences from a heightened sense of peace. INNOCENCE REMEMBERED is filled with invaluable information for anyone who is interested in personal healing, spiritual growth, ecological and economical balance, and global peace.

See Jane Hit

Why Girls Are Growing More Violent and What We Can Do About It

See Jane Hit

From one of America’s leading authorities on juvenile violence comes a groundbreaking investigation of the explosion of violent behavior in girls With Lost Boys, James Garbarino became our foremost explicator of violent behavior in boys. Now he turns his attention to its increasing incidence in girls. Twenty-five years ago, ten boys were arrested for assault for every one girl. Now that ratio is four-to-one and dropping. Combining clinical experience with incisive analyses of social trends, Garbarino traces the factors—many of them essentially positive—behind the epidemic: girls’ increased participation in sports and greater comfort with their physicality, but also their lack of training in handling aggression. See Jane Hit goes beyond diagnosing the problem to outline a clear-eyed, compassionate solution.

Shaping Biology

The National Science Foundation and American Biological Research, 1945-1975

Shaping Biology

Historians of the postwar transformation of science have focused largely on the physical sciences, especially the relation of science to the military funding agencies. In Shaping Biology, Toby A. Appel brings attention to the National Science Foundation and federal patronage of the biological sciences. Scientists by training, NSF biologists hoped in the 1950s that the new agency would become the federal government's chief patron for basic research in biology, the only agency to fund the entire range of biology—from molecules to natural history museums—for its own sake. Appel traces how this vision emerged and developed over the next two and a half decades, from the activities of NSF's Division of Biological and Medical Sciences, founded in 1952, through the cold war expansion of the 1950s and 1960s and the constraints of the Vietnam War era, to its reorganization out of existence in 1975. This history of NSF highlights fundamental tensions in science policy that remain relevant today: the pull between basic and applied science; funding individuals versus funding departments or institutions; elitism versus distributive policies of funding; issues of red tape and accountability. In this NSF-funded study, Appel explores how the agency developed, how it worked, and what difference it made in shaping modern biology in the United States. Based on formerly untapped archival sources as well as on interviews of participants, and building upon prior historical literature, Shaping Biology covers new ground and raises significant issues for further research on postwar biology and on federal funding of science in general. -- Margaret RossiterCornell University, author of Women Scientists in America: Before Affirmative Action, 1940-1972

CLEP Biology w/ Online Practice Exams

CLEP Biology w/ Online Practice Exams

Earn College Credit with REA's Test Prep for CLEP* Biology Everything you need to pass the exam and get the college credit you deserve. Our test prep for CLEP* Biology and the free online tools that come with it, will allow you to create a personalized CLEP* study plan that can be customized to fit you: your schedule, your learning style, and your current level of knowledge. Here's how it works: Diagnostic exam at the REA Study Center focuses your study Our online diagnostic exam pinpoints your strengths and shows you exactly where you need to focus your study. Armed with this information, you can personalize your prep and review where you need it the most. Most complete subject review for CLEP* Biology Our targeted review covers all the material you'll be expected to know for the exam and includes a glossary of must-know terms. Two full-length practice exams The online REA Study Center gives you two full-length practice tests and the most powerful scoring analysis and diagnostic tools available today. Instant score reports help you zero in on the CLEP* Biology topics that give you trouble now and show you how to arrive at the correct answer-so you'll be prepared on test day. REA is the acknowledged leader in CLEP* preparation, with the most extensive library of CLEP* titles available. Our test preps for CLEP* exams help you earn valuable college credit, save on tuition, and get a head start on your college degree.

Academic Press Dictionary of Science and Technology

Academic Press Dictionary of Science and Technology

Over 125,000 entries cover 124 scientific and technological fields, including acoustical engineering, cartography graphic arts, microbiology, organic chemistry, radiology, and zoology

Cornell

A History, 1940–2015

Cornell

In their history of Cornell since 1940, Glenn C. Altschuler and Isaac Kramnick examine the institution in the context of the emergence of the modern research university. The book examines Cornell during the Cold War, the civil rights movement, Vietnam, antiapartheid protests, the ups and downs of varsity athletics, the women's movement, the opening of relations with China, and the creation of Cornell NYC Tech. It relates profound, fascinating, and little-known incidents involving the faculty, administration, and student life, connecting them to the "Cornell idea" of freedom and responsibility. The authors had access to all existing papers of the presidents of Cornell, which deeply informs their respectful but unvarnished portrait of the university. Institutions, like individuals, develop narratives about themselves. Cornell constructed its sense of self, of how it was special and different, on the eve of World War II, when America defended democracy from fascist dictatorship. Cornell’s fifth president, Edmund Ezra Day, and Carl Becker, its preeminent historian, discerned what they called a Cornell "soul," a Cornell "character," a Cornell "personality," a Cornell "tradition"—and they called it "freedom." "The Cornell idea" was tested and contested in Cornell’s second seventy-five years. Cornellians used the ideals of freedom and responsibility as weapons for change—and justifications for retaining the status quo; to protect academic freedom—and to rein in radical professors; to end in loco parentis and parietal rules, to preempt panty raids, pornography, and pot parties, and to reintroduce regulations to protect and promote the physical and emotional well-being of students; to add nanofabrication, entrepreneurship, and genomics to the curriculum—and to require language courses, freshmen writing, and physical education. In the name of freedom (and responsibility), black students occupied Willard Straight Hall, the anti–Vietnam War SDS took over the Engineering Library, proponents of divestment from South Africa built campus shantytowns, and Latinos seized Day Hall. In the name of responsibility (and freedom), the university reclaimed them. The history of Cornell since World War II, Altschuler and Kramnick believe, is in large part a set of variations on the narrative of freedom and its partner, responsibility, the obligation to others and to one’s self to do what is right and useful, with a principled commitment to the Cornell community—and to the world outside the Eddy Street gate.