Mother Earth and the Gene Machines

What on Earth Is Wrong and What We Can Do about It

Mother Earth and the Gene Machines


The Gene Machine

How Genetic Technologies Are Changing the Way We Have Kids--and the Kids We Have

The Gene Machine

A sharp-eyed exploration of the promise and peril of having children in an age of genetic tests and interventions Is screening for disease in an embryo a humane form of family planning or a slippery slope toward eugenics? Should doctors tell you that your infant daughter is genetically predisposed to breast cancer? If tests revealed that your toddler has a genetic mutation whose significance isn’t clear, would you want to know? In The Gene Machine, the award-winning journalist Bonnie Rochman deftly explores these hot-button questions, guiding us through the new frontier of gene technology and how it is transforming medicine, bioethics, health care, and the factors that shape a family. Rochman tells the stories of scientists working to unlock the secrets of the human genome; genetic counselors and spiritual advisers guiding mothers and fathers through life-changing choices; and, of course, parents (including Rochman herself) grappling with revelations that are sometimes joyous, sometimes heartbreaking, but always profound. She navigates the dizzying and constantly expanding array of prenatal and postnatal tests, from carrier screening to genome sequencing, while considering how access to more tests is altering perceptions of disability and changing the conversation about what sort of life is worth living and who draws the line. Along the way, she highlights the most urgent ethical quandary: Is this technology a triumph of modern medicine or a Pandora’s box of possibilities? Propelled by human narratives and meticulously reported, The Gene Machine is both a scientific road map and a meditation on our power to shape the future. It is a book that gets to the very core of what it means to be human.

The Electric Gene Machine

The Electric Gene Machine

Genetic engineering is a technological infant, barely taking it's first baby steps. This collection of stories explores what happens when a boy starts doing strange things with Moms' violets; sports cars run away and go to sea, and Mother Goose comes to life with pumpkin houses and giant bean stalks.

Gene Machine

The Race to Decipher the Secrets of the Ribosome

Gene Machine

A Nobel Prize-winning biologist tells the riveting story of his race to discover the inner workings of biology's most important molecule "Ramakrishnan's writing is so honest, lucid and engaging that I could not put this book down until I had read to the very end." --Siddhartha Mukherjee, author of The Emperor of All Maladies and The Gene Everyone has heard of DNA. But by itself, DNA is just an inert blueprint for life. It is the ribosome--an enormous molecular machine made up of a million atoms--that makes DNA come to life, turning our genetic code into proteins and therefore into us. Gene Machine is an insider account of the race for the structure of the ribosome, a fundamental discovery that both advances our knowledge of all life and could lead to the development of better antibiotics against life-threatening diseases. But this is also a human story of Ramakrishnan's unlikely journey, from his first fumbling experiments in a biology lab to being the dark horse in a fierce competition with some of the world's best scientists. In the end, Gene Machine is a frank insider's account of the pursuit of high-stakes science.

The Selfish Gene

30th Anniversary Edition

The Selfish Gene

An ethologist shows man to be a gene machine whose world is one of savage competition and deceit.

The Gene Machine

The Race to Decipher the Secrets of the Ribosome

The Gene Machine

From Nobel Prize winner Venki Ramakrishnan ‘Beyond superb’ Bill Bryson ‘A wonderful book’ Ian McEwan Everyone knows about DNA. It is the essence of our being, influencing who we are and what we pass on to our children. But the information in DNA can’t be used without a machine to decode it. The ribosome is that machine. Older than DNA itself, it is the mother of all molecules. Virtually every molecule made in every cell was either made by the ribosome or by proteins that were themselves made by the ribosome. Venki Ramakrishnan tells the story of the race to uncover the ribosome’s enormously complex structure, a fundamental breakthrough that resolves an ancient mystery of life itself and could lead to the development of better antibiotics. A fascinating insider account, Gene Machine charts Ramakrishnan’s unlikely journey from his first fumbling experiments in a biology lab to being at the centre of a fierce competition at the cutting edge of modern science.

The Selfish Gene

The Selfish Gene

An ethologist shows man to be a gene machine whose world is one of savage competition and deceit

Genetics

Genetics


Human Nature After Darwin

A Philosophical Introduction

Human Nature After Darwin

Human Nature After Darwin is an original investigation of the implications of Darwinism for our understanding of ourselves and our situation. It casts new light on current Darwinian controversies, also providing an introduction to philosophical reasoning and a range of philosophical problems. Janet Radcliffe Richards claims that many current battles about Darwinism are based on mistaken assumptions about the implications of the rival views. Her analysis of these implications provides a much-needed guide to the fundamentals of Darwinism and the so-called Darwin wars, as well as providing a set of philosophical techniques relevant to wide areas of moral and political debate. The lucid presentation makes the book an ideal introduction to both philosophy and Darwinism as well as a substantive contribution to topics of intense current controversy. It will be of interest to students of philosophy, science and the social sciences, and critical thinking.

Summary & Study Guide - The Gene Machine

How Genetic Technologies Are Changing the Way We Have Kids - and the Kids We Have

Summary & Study Guide - The Gene Machine

The promise and peril of having children in an age of genetic tests and interventions. This is a summary of “The Gene Machine: How Genetic Technologies Are Changing the Way We Have Kids — and the Kids We Have,” by Bonnie Rochman. This book covers a variety of topics from breast cancer to Tay-Sachs, several pre-natal genetic mapping technologies, genome sequencing, rare disease diagnosis, silencing of a gene, and repairing gene defects using gene editing tools (CRISPR). It covers the question of testing for Down syndrome and abortion, and the emotionally and morally fraught decisions individuals are forced to make when confronting the information these tests reveal. Over the past few years, genetic testing has expanded into a full array of testing available prenatally, postnatally, and even pre-conception. A more targeted analysis has allowed women to weed out unhealthy embryos before attempting pregnancy. Genome sequencing gives the child’s blueprint, including a predisposition to diseases such as Down syndrome, early-onset Alzheimer’s, or breast cancer. Having access to so much information can be empowering, enlightening, confusing, and frightening. It can enable parents to prepare for a child with special needs. Or it could allow them to end the pregnancy. This is a must read for those planning on having kids, or for those who simply want to learn about genetic technologies. This guide includes: * Book Summary—helps you understand the key concepts. * Online Videos—cover the concepts in more depth. Value-added from this guide: * Save time * Understand key concepts * Expand your knowledge