Boxing Like the Champs

Lessons from Boxing's Greatest Fighters

Boxing Like the Champs

How did the old school, all time champs — like Jack Dempsey, Kid McCoy, Sonny Liston and Stanley Ketchel — do it? This manual examines some of the best and most interesting fighters in boxing history and gets inside the historical import of what they accomplished. Examining the training, technique and tactics of past champions, this book provides readers with recreated templates to drill and box precisely as the greats did. Here are five benefits a reader will gain from this book: 1. Gain historical perspective on one of mankind's most riveting and oldest sports. 2. Hone boxing skills via historical recreation modeling. 3. Create bonding with the material through historical perspective and physical execution. 4. Transform your boxing game as you learn to shift gears through champion mindsets. 5. Learn the valuable skill of immersion training versus simulacra training.

The First Black Boxing Champions

Essays on Fighters of the 1800s to the 1920s

The First Black Boxing Champions

This volume presents fifteen chapters of biography of African American and black champions and challengers of the early prize ring. They range from Tom Molineaux, a slave who won freedom and fame in the ring in the early 1800s; to Joe Gans, the first African American world champion; to the flamboyant Jack Johnson, deemed such a threat to white society that film of his defeat of former champion and “Great White Hope” Jim Jeffries was banned across much of the country. Photographs, period drawings, cartoons, and fight posters enhance the biographies. Round-by-round coverage of select historic fights is included, as is a foreword by Hall-of-Fame boxing announcer Al Bernstein.

When Boxing Was, Like, Ridiculously Racist

When Boxing Was, Like, Ridiculously Racist

This is the story of the lineage of Boxing's World Heavyweight Championship from 1882-1915 and how it explains a cultural attitude toward race and identity in that era. The first true national and international sports celebrities were boxers in the late 1800s. Soon after the abolishment of slavery in the United States the first World Champions of the sport were crowned. As the Champion of the World these boxing heavyweights were held on a pedestal of athletic dominance, and in the eyes of some white Americans, and many of those in the boxing community, these champions had to be white, anything else would challenge the belief of white Anglo-saxon superiority that many white Americans were clinging to at the time. It is the story of the symbol of the World Champion during that period and what it meant in society. It's also a story about a bunch of tough, bad-ass guys from over a hundred years ago that used to beat each other up.

The Boxing Filmography

American Features, 1920-2003

The Boxing Filmography

The love affair between boxing and Hollywood began with the dawn of film. As early as the days of Chaplin, the "boxing film" had assumed its place as a subgenre, and over the decades it has taken the forms of biographies, dramas, romances, comedies, and even musicals and westerns. Such well known pictures as The Champ, Body and Soul, Don King: Only in America, Girl Fight, The Irish in Us, The Kid from Brooklyn, Somebody Up There Likes Me, Raging Bull, each of the Rocky movies and When We Were Kings are just a few examples of the feature films included in this filmography. Thoroughly researched, this work examines 98 boxing films from the 1920s through 2003. Each entry provides basic filmographic data (the film's studio, its genre, its length, cast and credits); a detailed synopsis of the film; illuminating commentary on the boxing sequences; and excerpts from contemporary reviews. Most entries also summarize the making of the film, with particular attention to the training of the actors for the boxing scenes. The filmography also includes information on studio publicity releases and advertisements, press books and exhibitor campaign materials for each film.

Heavyweight Boxing in the 1970s

The Great Fighters and Rivalries

Heavyweight Boxing in the 1970s

"This book is a presentation of all of the figures and events of the greatest era in boxing history. The first chapter compares the seventies to all of the other eras. Chapter two covers the t1960s and the circumstances that led to the blossoming of unprecedented competition. The remaining ten chapters cover the years 1970 through to 1979"--Provided by publisher.

The Legendary ‘Lugs Branigan’ – Ireland’s Most Famed Garda

How One Man became Dublin’s Tough Justice Legend

The Legendary ‘Lugs Branigan’ – Ireland’s Most Famed Garda

Garda and guardian. Protector and punisher. This is ‘Lugs’ Branigan: the man, the legend. The story of ‘Lugs’ Branigan is a tale that is long overdue. It is a story of extraordinary courage and compassion, a story of heroism and altruism, a story of crime, punishment and redemption. The legend of ‘Lugs’’s career as Ireland’s most famous garda (police officer), founded on his physical strength and the manner in which he faced up to the criminal gangs of Dublin over the course of fifty years, is part of Dublin’s folk history. In The Legendary ‘Lugs’ Branigan, bestselling historian Kevin C. Kearns presents a revealing and unvarnished portrait of the man and his life, authenticated by the oral testimony of family members, friends and Garda mates who stood with him through the most harrowing and poignant experiences. Born in the Liberties of Dublin in 1910, Jim Branigan was, by his own admission, a shy, scrawny ‘sissy’ as a lad. Cruelly beaten by bullies in the railway yard where he worked during his teens, he refused to fight back. Yet he went on to become a heavyweight boxing champion and to earn the ‘undisputed reputation as the country's toughest and bravest garda’. Chief Superintendent Edmund Doherty proclaimed him ‘one of those people who become a legend in his own time’. As a garda he refused to carry a baton, relying upon his fists. He took on the vicious ‘animal gangs’ of the 1930s and 40s and in the ‘Battle of Baldoyle’ broke their reign of terror. In the 1950s he quelled the wild ‘rock-and-roll riots’ and tamed the ruffian Teddy boys with their flick-knives. All the while, he was dealing with Dublin's full array of gurriers and criminals. As a devotee of American Western films and books, Branigan emulated the sheriffs by doling out his unique ‘showdown’ brand of summary justice to hooligans and thugs on the street. In the 1960s his riot squad with its Garda ‘posse’ patrolled Dublin's roughest districts in their ‘black Maria’. They contended with the most dangerous rows and riots in the streets, dancehalls and pubs. The cry ‘Lugs is here!’ could instantly scatter a disorderly crowd. Ironically, for all his fame as a tough, fearless garda, he was most beloved for his humanity and compassion. His role as guardian of the battered women of the tenements and as protector and father figure of the city's piteous prostitutes—or ‘pavement hostesses’, as he called them—was unrecorded in the press and hushed up by the Garda brass. Yet, Garda John Collins vouches, ‘Women … oh, he was God to them!’ Upon retirement he entered his ‘old gunfighter’ years; ageing and vulnerable, he became a target for old foes bent on revenge and for ‘young guns’ seeking a quick reputation. A man with a reputation powerful enough to echo through generations of Dubliners, the legendary ‘Lugs’ Branigan finally has a book worthy of his story.

Jet

Jet


Boxing in America: An Autopsy

Boxing in America: An Autopsy

This book presents a sweeping view of boxing in the United States and the influence of the sport on American culture. • Includes information from the early "bare knuckles" era of boxing up to modern-day stars and matchups, presenting the history of boxing in a chronological fashion

Stars in the Ring: Jewish Champions in the Golden Age of Boxing

A Photographic History

Stars in the Ring: Jewish Champions in the Golden Age of Boxing

In the period from 1901 to 1939, 29 Jewish boxers were recognized as world champions and more than 160 Jewish boxers ranked among the top contenders in their respective weight divisions. Stars in the Ring,by renowned boxing historian Mike Silver, presents this vibrant social history in the first illustrated encyclopedic compendium of its kind.

In the Pit with Piper

In the Pit with Piper

Here, in his own words, is the story of one of the greatest wrestlers ever—Rowdy Roddy Piper. The bagpipe-playing legend gets down and dirty about the world of professional wrestling—and his own career.