Boxing Like the Champs 2

More Lessons from Boxing's Greatest Fighters

Boxing Like the Champs 2

Get a load of just some of the recently unearthed gold in this volume: 1. Jack Johnson's "Biceps Punch." 2. Gentleman Jim's Not-Quite-a-Jab. 3. Joe Louis's "Attacking the Buckler" strategy. 4. Gunboat Smith's devastating "Occipital Punch." 5. Bare-knuckle legend Jack Slack's "Chopper." 6. The real deal on how Jack Dempsey built the power in that Lead Hook. 7. "Hurricane" Jackson's wild "Scoop Punch." 8. How Joe Frazier built his eccentric defensive rhythm.

Boxing Like the Champs

Lessons from Boxing's Greatest Fighters

Boxing Like the Champs

How did the old school, all time champs — like Jack Dempsey, Kid McCoy, Sonny Liston and Stanley Ketchel — do it? This manual examines some of the best and most interesting fighters in boxing history and gets inside the historical import of what they accomplished. Examining the training, technique and tactics of past champions, this book provides readers with recreated templates to drill and box precisely as the greats did. Here are five benefits a reader will gain from this book: 1. Gain historical perspective on one of mankind's most riveting and oldest sports. 2. Hone boxing skills via historical recreation modeling. 3. Create bonding with the material through historical perspective and physical execution. 4. Transform your boxing game as you learn to shift gears through champion mindsets. 5. Learn the valuable skill of immersion training versus simulacra training.

The First Black Boxing Champions

Essays on Fighters of the 1800s to the 1920s

The First Black Boxing Champions

This volume presents fifteen chapters of biography of African American and black champions and challengers of the early prize ring. They range from Tom Molineaux, a slave who won freedom and fame in the ring in the early 1800s; to Joe Gans, the first African American world champion; to the flamboyant Jack Johnson, deemed such a threat to white society that film of his defeat of former champion and “Great White Hope” Jim Jeffries was banned across much of the country. Photographs, period drawings, cartoons, and fight posters enhance the biographies. Round-by-round coverage of select historic fights is included, as is a foreword by Hall-of-Fame boxing announcer Al Bernstein.

Stars in the Ring: Jewish Champions in the Golden Age of Boxing

A Photographic History

Stars in the Ring: Jewish Champions in the Golden Age of Boxing

In the period from 1901 to 1939, 29 Jewish boxers were recognized as world champions and more than 160 Jewish boxers ranked among the top contenders in their respective weight divisions. Stars in the Ring,by renowned boxing historian Mike Silver, presents this vibrant social history in the first illustrated encyclopedic compendium of its kind.

The Boxing Filmography

American Features, 1920-2003

The Boxing Filmography

The love affair between boxing and Hollywood began with the dawn of film. As early as the days of Chaplin, the "boxing film" had assumed its place as a subgenre, and over the decades it has taken the forms of biographies, dramas, romances, comedies, and even musicals and westerns. Such well known pictures as The Champ, Body and Soul, Don King: Only in America, Girl Fight, The Irish in Us, The Kid from Brooklyn, Somebody Up There Likes Me, Raging Bull, each of the Rocky movies and When We Were Kings are just a few examples of the feature films included in this filmography. Thoroughly researched, this work examines 98 boxing films from the 1920s through 2003. Each entry provides basic filmographic data (the film's studio, its genre, its length, cast and credits); a detailed synopsis of the film; illuminating commentary on the boxing sequences; and excerpts from contemporary reviews. Most entries also summarize the making of the film, with particular attention to the training of the actors for the boxing scenes. The filmography also includes information on studio publicity releases and advertisements, press books and exhibitor campaign materials for each film.

Heavyweight Boxing in the 1970s

The Great Fighters and Rivalries

Heavyweight Boxing in the 1970s

"This book is a presentation of all of the figures and events of the greatest era in boxing history. The first chapter compares the seventies to all of the other eras. Chapter two covers the t1960s and the circumstances that led to the blossoming of unprecedented competition. The remaining ten chapters cover the years 1970 through to 1979"--Provided by publisher.

The Arc of Boxing

The Rise and Decline of the Sweet Science

The Arc of Boxing

Are today’s boxers better than their predecessors, or is modern boxing a shadow of its former self? Boxing historians discuss the socioeconomic and demographic changes that have affected the quality, prominence and popularity of the sport over the past century. Among the interviewees are world-renowned scholars, some of the sport’s premier trainers, and former amateur and professional world champions. Chapters cover such topics as the ongoing deterioration of boxers’ skills, their endurance, the decline in the number of fights and the psychological readiness of championship-caliber boxers. The strengths and weaknesses of today’s superstars are analyzed and compared to those of such past greats as Joe Louis, Sugar Ray Robinson, Jack Dempsey and Jake LaMotta.

The Life Experiences of a World War II, Korea, and Vietnam Black American Army Veteran

The Life Experiences of a World War II, Korea, and Vietnam Black American Army Veteran

I gave considerable thought as to what the title of my autobiography should be. There was never any question that a portion of the title would read, "The Life Experiences of a World War II, Korea, and Vietnam ______? American Army Veteran", but how would I be described in view of the many "race" descriptions the U.S. Census has used for the black citizens since the first census in 1790? Should I be described as a Colored, Black, Mulatto, Quadroon, Octoroon, African American, or Negro American Army Veterans? I chose BLACK as being the most descriptive term and, as James Brown said, I'm black and I'm proud! My life experiences include a few race-related incidents that occurred before, during and after my military service. Each incident could have greatly influenced my overall attitude towards life, in general, and in an adverse manner, but fortunately did not. Q. Jarone Batson

We are the Champions: The Politics of Sports and Popular Music

The Politics of Sports and Popular Music

We are the Champions: The Politics of Sports and Popular Music

Sports and popular music are synergistic agents in the construction of identity and community. They are often interconnected through common cross-marketing tactics and through influence on each other's performative strategies and stylistic content. Typically only studied as separate entities, popular music and sport cultures mutually 'play' off each other in exchanges of style, ideologies and forms. Posing unique challenges to notions of mind - body dualities, nationalism, class, gender, and racial codes and sexual orientation, Dr Ken McLeod illuminates the paradoxical and often conflicting relationships associated with these modes of leisure and entertainment and demonstrates that they are not culturally or ideologically distinct but are interconnected modes of contemporary social practice. Examples include how music is used to enhance sporting events, such as anthems, chants/cheers, and intermission entertainment, music that is used as an active part of the athletic event, and music that has been written about or that is associated with sports. There are also connections in the use of music in sports movies, television and video games and important, though critically under-acknowledged, similarities regarding spectatorship, practice and performance. Despite the scope of such confluences, the extraordinary impact of the interrelationship of music and sports on popular culture has remained little recognized. McLeod ties together several influential threads of popular culture and fills a significant void in our understanding of the construction and communication of identity in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.

Postwar America

An Encyclopedia of Social, Political, Cultural, and Economic History

Postwar America

From the outbreak of the Cold War to the rise of the United States as the last remaining superpower, the years following World War II were filled with momentous events and rapid change. Diplomatically, economically, politically, and culturally, the United States became a major influence around the globe. On the domestic front, this period witnessed some of the most turbulent and prosperous years in American history. "Postwar America: An Encyclopedia of Social, Political, Cultural, and Economic History" provides detailed coverage of all the remarkable developments within the United States during this period, as well as their dramatic impact on the rest of the world. A-Z entries address specific persons, groups, concepts, events, geographical locations, organizations, and cultural and technological phenomena. Sidebars highlight primary source materials, items of special interest, statistical data, and other information; and Cultural Landmark entries chronologically detail the music, literature, arts, and cultural history of the era. Bibliographies covering literature from the postwar era and about the era are also included, as are illustrations and specialized indexes.